Extractions:
Having a tooth removed can be an upsetting and anxious experience. Wherever possible, I strive to save the tooth, however, if due to decay or fracture an extraction is inevitable, I utilise several techniques to make it as comfortable for you as possible.

Modern day local anaesthetics have made pain on extraction a thing of the past. I make sure the area is completely numb before commencing and I am guided by you at all times. Pressure sensation is commonly experienced during the procedure. This is perfectly normal and is well tolerated by most patients.

Patients commonly mention how simple the procedure was, but if you are feeling particularly anxious, you may choose to have your treatment performed under sedation or general anaesthesia. I am happy to discuss these options with you.

If you are concerned about spaces in you mouth after extractions, we can also offer aesthetic implants or bridges to replace you missing teeth promptly.

Wisdom Teeth:

You probably know a family member or friend who’s had their wisdom teeth removed. You may be wondering if yours need to be removed too. Wisdom teeth typically erupt between the ages of 17 and 25. Studies show that in some ethnic groups, people’s jaws are getting smaller due to more refined diets and teeth are not wearing anywhere near as much. By the time wisdom teeth are ready to erupt, there is inadequate space at the back of the mouth to accommodate them. If your teeth remain sealed deep within jaw bone or come through fully, they are usually not a problem. It’s only if they grow on an angle or get stuck half way through, a pocket of gum remains around the tooth. This serves as a perfect reservoir for bacteria and infection to flourish and can cause recurrent episode of infection. If this is the case I will recommend having your teeth removed.

If your wisdom teeth never came through, it’s possible that you don’t have them. A simple x-ray can tell me where all you wisdom teeth are and if you have them. I will then make a recommendation.